Specialty

The candles with the crackle pattern: Barrick Candles burn beautifully.  They are meant to be used and enjoyed. Made in the U.S.A.

First, be sure to use the candles on a sturdy and fireproof surface. You can use a candleholder to elevate the candles or simply place them on a fireproof surface such as stone, glass or ceramic.

Are they drip less? 
Well there really is no such thing as a 100% drip less candle except a jar candle. Barrick Candles are pretty darn good at resisting dripping as long as you keep them out of a draft.  Candles can drip for many reasons.  In designing a candle it is a balancing act between the size of the candle, the size and type of wick, the quality of the wax and a whole slew of factors contributed by the consumer.

We consider Barrick Candles to be very resistant to dripping when kept free from drafts.  But, it does not mean that they will never drip.  Use a holder or plate to catch any possible drip.

When burning a set of candles, separate each candle in the group by several inches.  This will prevent the heat from a lower candle affecting the burning of the others.

We have developed a blend of very high-grade paraffin waxes.  They stand up to relatively high temperatures without slumping, they burn cleanly and for a very long time.  The wicks we use are cotton and natural fibers without any metal.  We select their size and type for optimal burning.

Burning factors that you contribute 
The biggest cause of dripping with a high quality candle is from a draft.  A draft pushes the flame and its heat to one side of the candle.  This results in that side melting lower and possibly allowing the pool of molten wax to begin to drip.  Always avoid drafts. Other factors in the burning characteristics are the length of time that you burn the candles each time you use them and the ambient temperature where you are burning them.

About smoke and soot
Barrick Candles are very clean burning. This comes from our selection of wick and using a very high grade, low oil content wax.  These waxes are significantly more expensive than the waxes found in most jar candles.  If you do observe any smoke from the candles while burning, the wick needs to be trimmed shorter. Shortening the wick will result in a clean burning flame.
 

 
Are they Soy Wax? Nope!  Soy wax is fine for a jar candle but that is it.  Soy "wax" is hydrogenated soy bean oil. Not much different than Crisco (TM) It is a soft mush that is opaque, does not take color well and can not be used in a free standing candle unless it is mixed with a whole lot of other wax usually paraffin.